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  • SSCS
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    Length: 01:30:00
01 Mar 2021

Abstract - Growing serial I/O data rates, over both severe low-pass electrical and dispersive optical channels, necessitate increased equalization complexity and consideration of more bandwidth-efficient modulation schemes, such as four-level pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM4). Serial links which utilize ADC-based receiver front-ends offer a potential solution, as they enable more powerful and flexible DSP for
equalization and symbol detection and can easily support advanced modulation schemes. This tutorial will provide an overview of key concepts in ADC-based serial links that support operation over high-loss channels. Topics covered include high-speed ADC topologies, digital equalizers, benefits of partial analog equalization, modeling approaches, and calibration techniques.
Bio - Samuel Palermo received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University, College Station, TX in 1997 and 1999, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA in 2007. From 1999 to 2000, he was with Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX, where he worked on the design of mixed-signal integrated circuits for high-speed serial data
communication. From 2006 to 2008, he was with Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR, where he worked on high-speed optical and electrical I/O architectures. In 2009, he joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Texas A&M University where he is currently an associate professor. His research interests include highspeed electrical and optical interconnect architectures, RF photonics, high performance clocking circuits, and integrated sensor systems. Dr. Palermo is a recipient of a 2013 NSF-CAREER award. He is a member of Eta Kappa Nu and IEEE. He has served as an associate editor for IEEE Transactions on
Circuits and System – II from 2011 to 2015 and has served on the IEEE CASS Board of Governors from 2011 to 2012. He is currently a distinguished lecturer for the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society. He was a coauthor of the Jack Raper Award for Outstanding Technology-Directions Paper at the 2009 International Solid-State Circuits Conference, the Best Student Paper at the 2014 Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, and the Best Student Paper at the 2016 Dallas Circuits and Systems Conference. He received the Texas A&M University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Outstanding Professor Award in 2014 and the Engineering Faculty Fellow Award in 2015.

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